M¨¦tis Nation of Ontario
500 Old St. Patric St, Unit3
Ottawa, ON
K1N 9G4

Tel.: 613-798-1488
Toll Free: 800-263-4889
Fax: 613-722-4225

แจกเครดิตฟรี 500 ไม่ต้องฝาก_คาสิโนออนไลน์ สล็อต_เครดิตเดิมพันฟรี

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From a genealogical perspective, in order to become a MNO citizen you need to demonstrate and ancestral connection to the M¨¦tis Nation. ?This is based on the MNO¡¯s definition of M¨¦tis that was unanimously adopted by the 2004 MNO Annual General Assembly in 2004 and is presently in the MNO¡¯s bylaws. ?This definition reads:
¡°Citizenship in the MNO shall be limited to individuals interested in furthering the objects of the MNO and who are M¨¦tis within the definition adopted by the MNO in accordance with the M¨¦tis National Council, which is as follows:
M¨¦tis means a person who self-identifies as M¨¦tis, is distinct from other Aboriginal peoples, is of historic M¨¦tis Nation ancestry, and is accepted by the M¨¦tis Nation.¡±
This definition is consistent with the M¨¦tis National Council¡¯s National Definition for Citizenship within the M¨¦tis Nation that was adopted in 2002. ?The National Definition is also in place in all of the M¨¦tis Nation¡¯s other governments across the M¨¦tis Nation Homeland, including, the Manitoba M¨¦tis Federation, M¨¦tis Nation ¨C Saskatchewan, M¨¦tis Nation of Alberta and M¨¦tis Nation British Columbia.
The adoption of these definitions were an exercise of the M¨¦tis Nation¡¯s inherent right to self-determination as a distinct Aboriginal people. ?The MNO definition provides for the following four conditions to be met for M¨¦tis citizenship:
? self-identification as M¨¦tis,
? proof of historic M¨¦tis Nation ancestry,
? is distinct from other Aboriginal peoples, and
? is accepted by the M¨¦tis Nation.
Notably, in 2003, the Supreme Court of Canada in its judgment in R. v. Powley recognized that ¡°[a] M¨¦tis community can be defined as a group of M¨¦tis with a distinctive collective identity, living together in the same geographic area and sharing a common way of life. ?The court also added that section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, ¡°¡­represents Canada¡¯s commitment to recognize and value the distinctive M¨¦tis cultures, which grew up in areas not yet open to colonization.¡± ? ?In both of these conclusions, the court emphasized the distinctiveness of M¨¦tis culture and collective identity
Thus to enjoy M¨¦tis citizenship it is not enough for an individual to point simply to an Aboriginal ancestor (i.e., a First Nation ancestor). ?M¨¦tis identity and rights from a distinctive M¨¦tis history, culture and way of life that emerged in the M¨¦tis Nation Homeland. ?As the MNO¡¯s Interim Registry Policy notes, a successful applicant must have a documented genealogical connection to a ¡°M¨¦tis ancestor, not an Indian or Aboriginal ancestor.¡±
¡°M¨¦tis ancestors¡± are identified in the historic record in various ways. ?For example, by and large in Ontario, the term ¡°M¨¦tis¡± is not seen. ?For the most part, the term ¡°Halfbreed¡± is used and may be modified in various ways (i.e. French Breed, Other Breed, English Breed, Breed, etc.). ?As well, other terms in the historic record can be proof of a historic M¨¦tis ancestor too (i.e., chicot, bois-brule, Canadien, northmen, etc.). ?As well, in some cases the context of the timeframe, kinship connections, and location of where the M¨¦tis ancestor was living may also need to be factored into a determination.
As mentioned in the guide¡¯s introduction, many applicants may not know where to look to find documents that identify Metis ancestors in Ontario, since they are not as well-published or known. ?It is for these reasons that the MNO has decided to develop this guide. ?This guide will provide an applicant with some basic knowledge about how to conduct genealogical research. ?It also provides a catalogue of sources to assist your research. ?Put together, the set out methodology and the various sources identified in this guide can likely provide the information necessary for an applicant to be able to trace themselves ¨C generation by generation ¨C back to an historic Metis ancestor in Ontario or throughout the M¨¦tis Nation. ?By demonstrating an ancestral connection to a historic M¨¦tis ancestor through documented proof, an individual will meets the MNO¡¯s requirements for citizenship.
? Insert Graphic - Include sample generation by generation chart here to ¡°historic M¨¦tis ancestor¡±

From a genealogical perspective, in order to become a MNO citizen you need to demonstrate an ancestral connection to the M¨¦tis Nation.? This is based on the MNO¡¯s definition of M¨¦tis that was unanimously adopted by the 2004 MNO Annual General Assembly in 2004 and is presently in the MNO¡¯s bylaws.? This definition reads:

Citizenship in the MNO shall be limited to individuals interested in furthering the objects of the MNO and who are M¨¦tis within the definition adopted by the MNO in accordance with the M¨¦tis National Council, which is as follows:

M¨¦tis means a person who self-identifies as M¨¦tis, is distinct from other Aboriginal peoples, is of historic M¨¦tis Nation ancestry, and is accepted by the M¨¦tis Nation.

This definition is consistent with the M¨¦tis National Council¡¯s National Definition for Citizenship within the M¨¦tis Nation that was adopted in 2002.? The National Definition is also in place in all of the M¨¦tis Nation¡¯s other governments across the M¨¦tis Nation Homeland, including, the Manitoba M¨¦tis Federation, M¨¦tis Nation ¨C Saskatchewan, M¨¦tis Nation of Alberta and M¨¦tis Nation British Columbia.

The adoption of these definitions was an exercise of the M¨¦tis Nation¡¯s inherent right to self-determination as a distinct Aboriginal people.? The MNO definition provides for the following four conditions to be met for M¨¦tis citizenship:

  • self-identification as M¨¦tis,
  • proof of historic M¨¦tis Nation ancestry,
  • is distinct from other Aboriginal peoples, and
  • is accepted by the M¨¦tis Nation.

Notably, in 2003, the Supreme Court of Canada in its judgment in R. v. Powley recognized that ¡°[a] M¨¦tis community can be defined as a group of M¨¦tis with a distinctive collective identity, living together in the same geographic area and sharing a common way of life.? The court also added that section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, ¡°¡­represents Canada¡¯s commitment to recognize and value the distinctive M¨¦tis cultures, which grew up in areas not yet open to colonization.¡±??? In both of these conclusions, the court emphasized the distinctiveness of M¨¦tis culture and collective identity

Thus to enjoy M¨¦tis citizenship it is not enough for an individual to point simply to an Aboriginal ancestor (i.e., a First Nation ancestor).? M¨¦tis identity and rights stem from a distinctive M¨¦tis history, culture and way of life that emerged in the M¨¦tis Nation Homeland.? As the MNO¡¯s Interim Registry Policy notes, a successful applicant must have a documented genealogical connection to a ¡°M¨¦tis ancestor, not an Indian or Aboriginal ancestor.¡±

¡°M¨¦tis ancestors¡± are identified in the historic record in various ways.? For example, by and large in Ontario, the term ¡°M¨¦tis¡± is not seen.? For the most part, the term ¡°Halfbreed¡± is used and may be modified in various ways (i.e. French Breed, Other Breed, English Breed, Breed, etc.).? As well, other terms in the historic record can be proof of a historic M¨¦tis ancestor too (i.e., chicot, bois-brule, Canadien, northmen, etc.).? As well, in some cases the context of the timeframe, kinship connections, and location of where the M¨¦tis ancestor was living may also need to be factored into a determination.? ?

As mentioned in the guide¡¯s introduction, many applicants may not know where to look to find documents that identify Metis ancestors in Ontario, since they are not as well-published or known.? It is for these reasons that the MNO has decided to develop this guide.? This guide will provide an applicant with some basic knowledge about how to conduct genealogical research.? It also provides a catalogue of sources to assist your research.? Put together, the set out methodology and the various sources identified in this guide can likely provide the information necessary for an applicant to be able to trace themselves ¨C generation by generation ¨C back to an historic Metis ancestor in Ontario or throughout the M¨¦tis Nation.? By demonstrating an ancestral connection to a historic M¨¦tis ancestor through documented proof, an individual will meets the MNO¡¯s requirements for citizenship.

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